June Architecture Spotlight
on Brutalism

The Edifice scarf is giving a soft touch to the roughness of Brutalist architecture. Brutalist architecture gained popularity around the world in the 1950s and largely consists of buildings that implement the use of large geometric forms and raw concrete finishes. Architects inspired by the Brutalist movement include Louis KahnLe Corbusier, and Paul Rudolph.

The Edifice scarf consists of a royal blue pattern that mimics the large geometric openings found in Brutalist buildings. Read below to learn more about one of our favorite Brutalist architects.


Louis Kahn was an architect who designed many buildings in
the Brutalist style.


Kimbell Art Museum in Texas. © Utile via Architectuul.

Kimbell Art Museum in Texas. © Utile via Architectuul.

"A great building must begin with the unmeasurable, must go through measurable means when it is being designed and in the end must be unmeasurable."

— Louis Kahn

Louis Kahn (1901-1946) was one of the greatest American architects of the 20th century. He was born in Estonia and later moved to Philadelphia where he stayed for the rest of his life. He was an architect who truly felt that well-designed buildings could change people's lives for the better. Kahn believed that buildings should not stand as mere beautiful objects, but should also respond to the humanistic need of the people that reside in them. His mission was to create buildings that evoked a spiritual sense of living and strived to design architecture that was meaningful and important. Kahn was known for his synthesis of many movements including Brutalism, Beaux-Arts, and Arts and Crafts. 

Louis Kahn's major works include:

• Salk Institute in La Jolla, California
• Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut
• Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas
• National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Sources: ArchDaily + Oxford Art + Vitra Design Museum

Louis Kahn looking at his tetrahedral ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery. Image © Lionel Freedman via ArchDaily.

Louis Kahn looking at his tetrahedral ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery. Image © Lionel Freedman via ArchDaily.

National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Image © Naquib Hossain.

National Assembly Building in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Image © Naquib Hossain.